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i . 1924 - 22.VI.2003
 TUT.BY





(#12)

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Summary

DZIEJASŁOÚ has turned two It may be too early to sum things up, but this means a certain landmark for us. DZIEJASŁOÚ has clearly positioned itself on the Belarusian literary and artistic scene as a really independent magazine, a viable alternative to the official state mouthpieces. We give writers a choice where to publish their works and who to side with Of course, there is no way of embracing the infinity but in each issue we try to bring together the older and the younger generations, prose-writers, poets, translators, essayists, literary and art critics
In the 12th issue you will come across both DZIEJASŁOÚs regular contributors and totally new names. The Prose section opens with the oldest Belarusian writer Janka Bryls Notes. You can also find here the second part of the biographical novel The Circle by Aleś Paškievič, short stories This Tin-worth Life by Siarhiej Rubleski and In the Pit by Aleś Rybak, as well as The Window, a novella by Biełastok-based writer Mira Łukša.
The Poetry section begins with A Lonely Star, a number of poems from Poste Restante book by Hienadź Buraúkin, Belarus State Prize Winner. Then, one of the most popular young poets Andrej Chadanovič claims, I Can Do That, Too in his sort of poems. Meanwhile, the Peoples Poet of Belarus Ryhor Baradulin, who is rightly considered a classic of Belarusian literature, offers you Čarhavi, his translations from Ganad Charkazian, who has been living in Belarus for quite a time and writing in Kurdish. We also hope you will enjoy reading The Strange Things by Alaksiej Saroka from Dziaržynsk and A World of Clay by Śviatłana Varonik from Bieraście.
As for debuts, you can judge for yourselves how good is poet and translator Arciom Araonak as a prose-writer; just read his I Am Silent. And do not miss Im Coming Back to Town by a 16-year old Miensk schoolboy Ciemryk Vialet.
There is an extract from Port-Soudan by French novelist Olivier Rolin, rendered into Belarusian by Juraś Barysievič, and a series of poems A White Stone by Tadeusz Żukowski, translated from Polish by Leanarda Muchina.
As usual Essays and Art Criticism are among DZIEJASŁOÚs centrepieces. We expect you must be looking forward to reading another part of The Great Treachery by Valancin Akudovič and The Contested Lithuanian-Belarusian Fatherland by American researcher Timothy Snyder. Besides, Siarhiej Ziankievič comes up with his travel notes He Who Impales or A Journey to the Land of Count Dracula. And musicologist Anatol Mialhuj reviews the Belarusian rock music of the late 1990s and the early 2000s (see The Uprising of Electric Guitars), while Halina Bahdanava gives a profile of the renowned Belarusian artist Jahien Kulik, who she calls The Knight of His Belarus.
The Bookronicle has in stock a few brief reviews of the most absorbing books published recently: Łada Alejnik in Between Reality and Dream discusses The Heart of the Marble Angel by Ludmiła Rubleúskaja and Viktar Korbut in Music with No Lyrics gives his evaluation of Traditional Belarusian Garments by Michaś Ramaniuk. In addition, Fiodar Drabienia in Familiar Novelties analyses The Tired Devil by Siarhiej Kavaloú, Vasil Žukovič in The Light of Love and Remembrance writes about And There Is No Stain on You by Nił Hilevič, Rajisa Šastak in Poetic Telegrams assesses The Leap Year by Uładzimir Siúčykaú and finally M. Bołačka in The 21st Century Atlas praises Andrej Chadanovič for Letters from under a Blanket.