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i . 1924 - 22.VI.2003
 TUT.BY





(#15)

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Summary

It is three years since Vasil Byka passed away. So it is only natural that the June DZIEJASŁOÚ is to a large extent dedicated to the Great Belarusian. We go on publishing Vasil Bykas memories, The Dotted Line of Life, which cover the beginning of the war between the Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. You can also find here Vasil Bykaús correspondence with Ałaksandar Łukašuk, Head of the Belarusian RFE/RL (see Letters Are Like Manna from Heaven for Me) and Siarhiej Abłamiejkas recollections of the time he spent with Vasil Byka in Prague and Miensk, when the writers days were actually numbered (see The Spring with Vasil Byka). In addition, the prominent Russian journalist Vladimir Molchanov offers his interview with Vasil Byka, I Am Rather a Confessor than a Preacher. It was recorded in 2000 in Germany.
But what DZIEJASŁOÚ opens with this time is A Well Crane Creaking, a series of poems by Vasil Zujonak, the State Prize Laureate, who is celebrating his jubilee. Besides, Michaś Skobła finds inspiration In the Seventh Heaven, Pavał Źmitruk explores The Territory of ChinŽa, Sofja ach gets lost Between Dawn and Dusk and Viktar Ślinka meditates on The Jug and Water.
As for the Prose section, it presents A Forfeit by Uładzimir Niaklajeú, Life Is Jazz by Uładzimir Ściapan, Tomas Mother-in-law by Vasil Tkačoú and the first part of Everyone Fought Their Own War by Mikoła Duboúski.
Readers of the Heritage section will be absorbed in Born under the Saturn by Viktar Valtar. Written in the 1920s, it has never been published in Belarus and features the life of Belarusian students in Prague, which the author witnessed and was involved in.
DZIEJASŁOÚ is happy to introduce our debutantes, a Miensk student Aleś Kvitkievič, who claims in his poems, I Sing You! and Valancin Bojka from Mazyr, who has come up with his piece of prose The Blunt Gate.
ValŽyna Mort has rendered into Belarusian a few poems by the renowned English poet Ted Hughes. You can see them in the Translations section under the heading The Flowers of Eden. Meanwhile, Natalla Kuc offers her version of The Kingdom of Łajłonija Tales by the no less established Polish writer Leszek Kałakowski.
The Essays and Criticism section opens with Koktebel Anomaly by Aleś Paškievič, who travels with Maksim Bahdanovič to the famous Crimean town, visited by the poet in 1915. In Urbi et Orbi Piotra Vasileúski features the living classic of Belarusian graphics Arlen Kaškurevič. Anatol Ivaščanka looks into the nature of remake, both so young and so old (see The Epoch of Remake). Taciana Murajova gives her appreciation of some debut books, published by Mastackaja Litaratura, including those by Michaś Kuleš, Alena Hińko, Taciana Siviec and Valeryja Kustava (see A Pink and Grey Debut).
This time our questionnaire is answered by poet Anatol Viarcinski and the Peoples Poet of Belarus Nił Hilevič.