12/24/2013 

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i . 1924 - 22.VI.2003
 TUT.BY





(#4)

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6
Summary

In September 2002 we published the 1st issue of DZIEJASŁOÚ, which made an alternative to the literary periodicals that came to be severely censured by the authorities. The board consists of writers who quitted those periodicals to protest against the state using brute force in literature. From the very start DZIEJASŁOÚ has been mostly publishing those authors, both well-known and young, who stand no chance of being accepted at state-controlled magazines and papers for ideological reasons
In our 4th issue DZIEJASŁOÚ presents such contemporary Belarusian poets as the State Prize Laureate Jurka Hołub with his series of poems From Tenderness to Anger, and Siarhiej Paniźnik with The Chandelier Is Burning, as well as some younger poets. Thus, Viktar šnip says We Live Under the Sky Just Like Under Ice, Ludka Silnova claims Your Name Is the Universe, Aleś Lipaj listens to Raindrops Whispering, Vasil Debiš feels The Desire to Live Growing Stronger, whereas Aleś Saroka makes his debut Till the Tea in the Mug Has Gone Cold.
The Prose section is quite rich in prominent names and has a lot to reveal. For instance, the State Prize Laureate Viktar Kaźko has offered us The Story of Cyla, a One-Eyed She-Goat. Meanwhile, Adam Hłobus comes up with his short story The Brother, Leanid Marakoú reminds us that The Orient Is a Subtle Thing, Uładzimir Ściapan speaks about The Tang of the Painted Flower, Barys Piatrovič describes The Express or Solitude Unfulfilled, whereas Aleh Daškievič thinks with Nostalgia for Naša Niva. In addition, Anatol Ivaščanka makes his debut with The Sketches.
The Social Writings section covers a great variety of issues. For over twenty five years the attribution of the anonymous poem The Song of Łysaja Hill has been one of the greatest mysteries of Belarusian literature. Dozens of researchers and the secret services literary experts have been painstakingly seeking to answer the question, Who is Francišak the Wizard of Łysaja Hill? So far, it has all been in vain. DZIEJASŁOÚ throws some light on the matter by publishing an inside story on how the poem was being written and disseminated and how it struck men of letters and the partys high officials. The author is still writing pseudonymously, but we promise that in our next issues you will see the notes of Francišak the Wizard of Łysaja Hill signed by his true name.
You will certainly be very interested to read Anatol Sidarevičs memories of Michaś Stralcoú, who lived a short and tragic life. They are entitled Chosen by Phoebus, the Sun God. And you will also have a unique possibility to read Michaś Stralcoús letters from the so-called medical and penitentiary institution, where he was forcefully being treated for alcoholism, as was a common Soviet practice.
Besides, DZIEJASŁOÚ brings forth the diaries of Maksim Łužanin, one of the most mysterious Belarusian authors of the 20th century, who passed away last year at the age of ninety and had always been in the centre of events, even in the hideous 1930s. You will find them under the title The Disordered House. It will be interesting to read The Western Buddhist Civilisation, an essay by philosopher Ihar Babkoú, and Whispering to Mexico, sketches by Uładzimir Klimovič, who has emigrated to Mexico and describes what the life of a Belarusian is like there. Meanwhile, Jaúhien Rahin ponders over the plight of todays Belarus in To See Honduras and to Die.
In the Art section Piotra Vasileúski gives a profile of Aleś Puškin in Puškin Avenue, while Franc Sales Hryl in The Artist of Fantastic Realism reveals the influence of literature on the eminent Belarusian graphic artist Valery Słavuk.
In the Literary Criticism section Iryna šaúlakova compares the books published this year by Boom-Bam-Lit and writings published in April in Litaratura i Mastactva weekly. Her polemical article is presented under the title The Cabinet of Curiosities: the Gopher Day. Meanwhile, Michaś Skobła shares his opinion of Aleś Maračkins album in The Suns neighbour.
You will enjoy The Duel by Patrick Süskind in the section of Translations, which has been rendered in Belarusian by the maestro Vasil Siomucha, and some poems by the Nobel Prize laureate Juan Ramon Jimnez translated by Ryhor Baradulin.