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i . 1924 - 22.VI.2003
 TUT.BY





(#3)Summary

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The 1st issue of DZIEJASŁOÚ appeared in September 2002. The new magazine on literature and art was launched as an alternative to the periodicals that the Belarusian authorities had robbed literati of. Right from the beginning, it has been advocating freedom of expression, upholding writers right to publish their works free from any ideological censorship. In our opinion, it is the readers indispensable right to be in the course of the latest literary achievements, getting an objective insight into cultural life both in Belarus and worldwide.
Our next issue opens with The Mechanical Universe, a collection of poems by Halina Bułyka. In the Poetry section you will find new poems by the State Prize Laureate Hiehadź Buraukin. They are entitled Poste Restante. In addition to those, Eduard Akulin reveals The Verseworld I Have Created, Ryhor Sitnica marvels at Marvelwords, Łarysa Ramanava is Bowing to the Knight, Aleś Arkuš travels From Połacak to Vilnia, whereas Vital Harbuzau makes his debut saying I Give My Warmth to Snow.
It is interesting that the ex-chairperson of the Belarusian Writers Union and a well established poet Uładzimir Niaklajeu takes on the role of a prose writer. His short story Long Live May 1! is the fruit of the years the author spent in Finland. Janka Sipakou, the prominent prose writer and poet, in his short story looks back on The Summer of 2002. The Prose section also offers a number of short stories by Anatol Kirviel from St.Petersburg, Anatol Krejdzič from Paleśsie, Iryna Varabiej from Canada, as well as Mirasłava Naviš, who makes her literary debut.
Theatre lovers will be pleased to go through Psyches Sisters by playwright Siarhiej Kavalou, while those who are fond of foreign literature can familiarise themselves with Epiphanies by the world-famous Latvian author Imants Ziedanis.
DZIEJASŁOÚs Social Writings section is quite versatile and covers a great variety of subjects. Thus, Uładzimir Arłou shares his impressions of travelling around western Europe in his essay A Little Concert for Cats in Milan, whereas Siarhiej Dubaviec in Kupała-magic attempts to single out and analyse the leitmotiv of Janka Kupałas works. DZIEJASŁOÚ presents the early 1990s diaries of the outstanding writer Aleś Adamovič, which are given under the title The Earth as a Borderline. Besides, Vital Karakouskis sketches Two Long Ones and a Short One introduce the reader into the life of the Jewish community in Babrujsk in the 1980s.
As for literary and cultural criticism, young researcher Taciana Kavalčuks article AK from 38 Petrovka St. dwells on the image of detective Anastasia Kamenskaya as an identity model of the post-Soviet woman. Meanwhile, Iryna Šaulakova contrasts different writings on the Słucak Insurgency, such as the stories by Vasil Bykau and Andrej Fiedarenka and the documentary novel by Aleś Paškievič.
In A Ticket to Paris art critic Piotra Vasileuski gives his appreciation of the works by Barys Zaborau, a well-known emigrant graphic artist. Halina Bahdanava features another celebrated Belarusian artist Aleś Maračkin in her contribution An Earthly Dreams Space. By the way, it is the imprints of Aleś Maračkins pictures that adorn this issues cover.
Last but not least, the Bookronicle section reviews the most interesting books and articles that have been recently published in Belarus.